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» Broccoli - The Cancer Fighter
» "Mind-body" Therapy Shows Promise For Fibromyalgia
» Understanding Why Your Health History Is Critical to Excellent Chiropractic Care
» Are Arthritis Sufferers Hesitating to Pursue Relief?
» Stop Drinking Soda & Coffee for Energy – Climb the Stairs Instead!

Broccoli - The Cancer Fighter

What if a few servings of broccoli a week could help prevent, even fight off prostate cancer? New research indicates there may just be truth to this. A team of British researchers from the Institute of Food Research found dietary broccoli consumption of 400 grams per week activated genes that control inflammation and cancer formation in the prostate. According to researchers, when people get cancer some genes are switched off and some are switched on, and, what broccoli seems to be doing is switching on genes which prevent cancer development and switching off other genes that help it to spread. Thus, dietary broccoli consumption was able to affect the expression of cancer formation/inflammation/spreading genes in a positive manner. Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in men with approximately 680,000 men diagnosed worldwide.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: PLoS One. July 2, 2008.


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"Mind-body" Therapy Shows Promise For Fibromyalgia

A form of 'mind-body' therapy that focuses on the role of emotions in physical pain may offer some relief to people with fibromyalgia, a small clinical trial suggests.

The study, of 45 women with fibromyalgia, found that those who learned a technique called "affective self-awareness" were more likely to show a significant reduction in their pain over six months. Overall, 46 percent of the women had a 30-percent or greater reduction in their pain severity, as measured by a standard pain-rating scale.

Fibromyalgia is a syndrome marked by widespread pain -- including discomfort at specific "tender points" in the body -- along with symptoms such as fatigue, irritable bowel and sleep problems. It is estimated to affect up to 5 million U.S. adults, most commonly middle-aged women.

The precise cause of fibromyalgia is unknown -- there are no physical signs, such as inflammation and tissue damage in the painful area -- but some researchers believe the disorder involves problems in how the brain processes pain signals.

Standard treatments include painkillers, antidepressants, cognitive- behavioral therapy and exercise therapy. However, many people with fibromyalgia find that their symptoms -- pain, in particular -- persist despite treatment.

Part of that, according to the researchers on the new study, may be because standard treatments do not specifically address the role psychological stress and emotions can play in triggering people's pain.

That is not to say that the pain people with fibromyalgia feel is "all in their head," stressed Dr. Howard Schubiner, of St. John Health/ Providence Hospital and Medical Centers in Southfield, Michigan.

"The pain is very real," Schubiner said in an interview. But, he explained, pain and emotions are "connected in the brain," and emotional factors may act to trigger "learned nerve pathways" that give rise to pain.

Past studies have found that compared with people without fibromyalgia, those with the disorder have higher rates of stressful life events, such as childhood abuse, marital problems and high levels of job stress. There is also evidence that they are relatively less aware of their own emotions and more reluctant to express their feelings, particularly anger.

For the new study, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Schubiner and his colleagues tested the effects of affective self-awareness -- a technique Schubiner developed and uses in treating certain chronic-pain conditions -- on fibromyalgia.

They randomly assigned 45 women with the condition to either undergo the therapy or go on a wait-list for treatment, serving as a control group. Women in the treatment group each had a one-on-one consultation, then attended three group meetings to learn the affective self-awareness techniques so that they could carry them out on their own.

The therapy involves an educational component where patients learn about the emotion-pain connection. They learn specific techniques -- including mindfulness meditation and "expressive" writing -- for recognizing and dealing with the emotions that may be contributing to their pain. Patients are also encouraged to get back to any exercise or other activities that they have been avoiding due to pain.

Schubiner's team found that six months later, 46 percent of the treatment group had at least a 30-percent reduction in their pain ratings compared with scores at the outset. And 21 percent had a 50-percent or greater reduction.
None of the women in the control group had a comparable improvement.

The study is only the first clinical trial to test affective self-awareness for fibromyalgia, and it had a number of limitations, including its small size. In addition, the control group received no active therapy to serve as a comparison.

That is important because it is possible for patients to benefit from simply receiving attention from a healthcare provider, or being part of small-group sessions with other people suffering from the same condition, for example.

Schubiner also acknowledged that this general "model" for understanding and addressing fibromyalgia pain is controversial.

He said that he and his colleagues have applied for funding to conduct a larger clinical trial comparing affective self-awareness with standard cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Affective self-awareness and cognitive-behavioral therapy have similarities, according to Schubiner. Both, for example, try to show patients that they have the power to improve their own health.

A key difference, Schubiner said, is that affective self-awareness asks people to "directly engage" the emotions that may be helping to drive their symptoms.

Another difference is that, right now, only a small number of healthcare providers practice affective self-awareness, according to Schubiner.

Some components of the technique, such as teachings in mindfulness meditation, are more widely available. But whether those practices in isolation would help fibromyalgia patients' pain is not clear.

Author: Reuters
Source: Journal of General Internal Medicine, online June 8, 2010.


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Understanding Why Your Health History Is Critical to Excellent Chiropractic Care

Chiropractors gather a new patient's full health history before the first round of care because it's crucial to providing not just the right care, but also the right chiropractic care. It's more than giving an adjustment. It's also about treating you as a whole. The human body is intricate and interconnected, making every last piece of your physical and mental health valuable. Missing information can thwart even the most experienced chiropractor's effort to help you heal.

Health History and Whole Body Chiropractic

Filling out that health history form is a necessary process. Your health history sets the stage for what kind of care you need. It also offers clues to health issues you might not be aware of, and helps your doctor arrive at the right conclusion when seeking a diagnosis. It’s critical to treating you as a whole instead of just your symptoms.

Health history reveals a lot about your lifestyle, too. For example, if you come in with neck pain and your health history shows a change in lifestyle that revolves around a desk job, which coincides with developing neck pain, not only can your chiropractor adjust chiropractic methods to meet your needs, s/he can offer you lifestyle guidance on how to prevent desk job-induced neck pain.

Health history also serves the purpose of identifying the root cause of your health issue(s). Say that same neck pain patient was also in a car accident a year previous to the appointment. That's going to trigger another set of questions to determine whether it was the car accident or the desk job causing neck pain. The true root cause determines the best way to treat you. Your chiropractor can make connections you might have never considered.

Your Emotional Health and Whole Body Chiropractic

Emotions manifest physically in so many ways. Positive emotions are life-giving while negative emotions can manifest as pain, hormone imbalances, impede organ function, give you headaches, rob you of sleep, upset your stomach, make you gain weight and so much more.

If a patient has so much pent up stress and anxiety, chiropractic doctors want to address that and make referrals as necessary. Sometimes a misalignment in the spine can lead to emotional distress, which then leads to physical ailments tied to where the misalignment is, like how high anxiety can give a person stomach issues. Addressing the root cause of your emotional imbalances can empower you to achieve true healing.

Chiropractic can help with emotional health in so many ways because of how it helps you physically. One of the most powerful ways is how the right adjustment in the right place can help restore proper neurological function. For example, that anxious patient with stomach issues likely has a lot of tension interfering with nerve signaling to the stomach. Chiropractic can help your body relax enough to curb anxiety and restore proper nerve signals, alleviating stomach issues in the process.

Your Current Health and Whole Body Chiropractic

Beyond the obvious that you’re at your trusted local chiropractor for obvious reasons, delving into your current health often unearths clues as to what’s going on. Candid conversations with your chiropractor help them get a better picture of what’s going on inside your body and gives them a better idea on how to best help you.

Your chiropractor wants to help you and connect you with the right care whenever your needs are best addressed by a different kind of health professional. There are so many ways chiropractic can do so much to help your body heal and achieve optimal health when they have the complete health history picture.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: ChiroPlanet.com


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Are Arthritis Sufferers Hesitating to Pursue Relief?

Arthritis is a serious and frustrating condition that affects tens of millions. This type of ailment can make a person’s daily routine much more difficult than it should be. Those afflicted with arthritis may have trouble lifting things, and they may even be inhibited from being mobile without facing serious pain. According to the CDC, more than 54 million adults in the US suffer from arthritis. The total number of afflicted individuals has increased by about 20 percent over the past 15 years. Not only is the condition's widespread prevalence concerning to the medical industry, but the lack of attention given to arthritis' status as a serious disability is also alarming.  One of the main reasons that people may be holding off on pursuing solutions for this condition is that the way to handle it can sometimes result in more pain in the short-term. A healthy amount of physical activity has been proven to help reduce arthritis pain. However, since exercise can be painful for someone who is already suffering from arthritis, some people avoid it altogether.  Though movement can be difficult for a person with this type of disability, it can be used to help ease the severity of the issue. The growing number of sufferers indicates that people are holding off on pursuing relief, though doing so could benefit them in the long-term.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: CDC, online March 7, 2017.


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Stop Drinking Soda & Coffee for Energy – Climb the Stairs Instead!

Drinking coffee first thing in the morning may seem like the logical way to perk up low energy levels. Researchers have found, though, that caffeine – either from soda, energy drinks, coffee, or tea – has less of an effect on a person’s energy as does physical activity. The physical activity promoted in this recent study: stair climbing. Climbing the stairs may be the last thing a person wants to do when they’ve had a long night, but according to a study in Reuters, taking the stairs has a more profound effect on energy than caffeine. The study followed young, busy women, as this is a demographic that is largely often sleep deprived. The women in the study averaged less than 6.5 hours of sleep each night. Some of the women were given a placebo, others a 50mg dose of caffeine, and the last group had to climb stairs for 10 minutes. After this, they were asked to describe their level of energy, and were also tested for cognitive awareness and function. This included testing their memory and reaction times. The women who climbed the stairs felt significantly more energized, particularly right after their exercise. According to Men’s Health, the activity didn’t reduce the participant’s cognitive function, which means that when a person exerts themselves physically they don’t exhaust themselves mentally. Medical News Today reports that the participants even had greater motivation to work after their jaunt up the stairs. So, after a sleepless night – ditch the caffeine and hit the stairs. You’ll feel better!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Physiology and Behavior, online March 14, 2017.


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