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March 2020 Health Newsletter

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» Broccoli - The Cancer Fighter
» "Mind-body" Therapy Shows Promise For Fibromyalgia
» Chiropractic Care Effective In Managing Leg and Arm Pain
» Exercise, It Really Is A Wonder Drug
» Most Parents Have Issues With Their Teenís Gaming Habits

Broccoli - The Cancer Fighter

What if a few servings of broccoli a week could help prevent, even fight off prostate cancer? New research indicates there may just be truth to this. A team of British researchers from the Institute of Food Research found dietary broccoli consumption of 400 grams per week activated genes that control inflammation and cancer formation in the prostate. According to researchers, when people get cancer some genes are switched off and some are switched on, and, what broccoli seems to be doing is switching on genes which prevent cancer development and switching off other genes that help it to spread. Thus, dietary broccoli consumption was able to affect the expression of cancer formation/inflammation/spreading genes in a positive manner. Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in men with approximately 680,000 men diagnosed worldwide.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: PLoS One. July 2, 2008.


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"Mind-body" Therapy Shows Promise For Fibromyalgia

A form of 'mind-body' therapy that focuses on the role of emotions in physical pain may offer some relief to people with fibromyalgia, a small clinical trial suggests.

The study, of 45 women with fibromyalgia, found that those who learned a technique called "affective self-awareness" were more likely to show a significant reduction in their pain over six months. Overall, 46 percent of the women had a 30-percent or greater reduction in their pain severity, as measured by a standard pain-rating scale.

Fibromyalgia is a syndrome marked by widespread pain -- including discomfort at specific "tender points" in the body -- along with symptoms such as fatigue, irritable bowel and sleep problems. It is estimated to affect up to 5 million U.S. adults, most commonly middle-aged women.

The precise cause of fibromyalgia is unknown -- there are no physical signs, such as inflammation and tissue damage in the painful area -- but some researchers believe the disorder involves problems in how the brain processes pain signals.

Standard treatments include painkillers, antidepressants, cognitive- behavioral therapy and exercise therapy. However, many people with fibromyalgia find that their symptoms -- pain, in particular -- persist despite treatment.

Part of that, according to the researchers on the new study, may be because standard treatments do not specifically address the role psychological stress and emotions can play in triggering people's pain.

That is not to say that the pain people with fibromyalgia feel is "all in their head," stressed Dr. Howard Schubiner, of St. John Health/ Providence Hospital and Medical Centers in Southfield, Michigan.

"The pain is very real," Schubiner said in an interview. But, he explained, pain and emotions are "connected in the brain," and emotional factors may act to trigger "learned nerve pathways" that give rise to pain.

Past studies have found that compared with people without fibromyalgia, those with the disorder have higher rates of stressful life events, such as childhood abuse, marital problems and high levels of job stress. There is also evidence that they are relatively less aware of their own emotions and more reluctant to express their feelings, particularly anger.

For the new study, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Schubiner and his colleagues tested the effects of affective self-awareness -- a technique Schubiner developed and uses in treating certain chronic-pain conditions -- on fibromyalgia.

They randomly assigned 45 women with the condition to either undergo the therapy or go on a wait-list for treatment, serving as a control group. Women in the treatment group each had a one-on-one consultation, then attended three group meetings to learn the affective self-awareness techniques so that they could carry them out on their own.

The therapy involves an educational component where patients learn about the emotion-pain connection. They learn specific techniques -- including mindfulness meditation and "expressive" writing -- for recognizing and dealing with the emotions that may be contributing to their pain. Patients are also encouraged to get back to any exercise or other activities that they have been avoiding due to pain.

Schubiner's team found that six months later, 46 percent of the treatment group had at least a 30-percent reduction in their pain ratings compared with scores at the outset. And 21 percent had a 50-percent or greater reduction.
None of the women in the control group had a comparable improvement.

The study is only the first clinical trial to test affective self-awareness for fibromyalgia, and it had a number of limitations, including its small size. In addition, the control group received no active therapy to serve as a comparison.

That is important because it is possible for patients to benefit from simply receiving attention from a healthcare provider, or being part of small-group sessions with other people suffering from the same condition, for example.

Schubiner also acknowledged that this general "model" for understanding and addressing fibromyalgia pain is controversial.

He said that he and his colleagues have applied for funding to conduct a larger clinical trial comparing affective self-awareness with standard cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Affective self-awareness and cognitive-behavioral therapy have similarities, according to Schubiner. Both, for example, try to show patients that they have the power to improve their own health.

A key difference, Schubiner said, is that affective self-awareness asks people to "directly engage" the emotions that may be helping to drive their symptoms.

Another difference is that, right now, only a small number of healthcare providers practice affective self-awareness, according to Schubiner.

Some components of the technique, such as teachings in mindfulness meditation, are more widely available. But whether those practices in isolation would help fibromyalgia patients' pain is not clear.

Author: Reuters
Source: Journal of General Internal Medicine, online June 8, 2010.


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Chiropractic Care Effective In Managing Leg and Arm Pain

A recent study finds chiropractic care highly effective for patients suffering from lower back (lumbar) and neck (cervical) radiculopathy - pain, numbness and/or tingling extending down the arm(s) or leg(s) due to nerve irritation related to the spine. In this study consisting of 162 patients, each received chiropractic manipulation, neuromobilization and exercise stabilization. Of the 162 patients, 10 unresolved cases were referred for epidural steroid injections, 10 were referred for further medical medication management and 3 cases were referred to undergo surgery. However, a total of 86 percent had resolution of their primary radicular complaints following their chiropractic care and thus were not required to received injections, medication management or surgery. According to the authors of the study, "The conservative management strategy we reviewed in our sample produced favorable outcomes for most of the patients with radiculopathy. The strategy appears to be safe." If you or another is suffering from pain, numbness or tingling in the extremities, contact your local chiropractor for a thorough evaluation. As this study demonstrates, chiropractic care is effective in many cases of cervical and lumbar radiculopathy and can be an appropriate, safe, non-invasive therapy for many.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Journal of Chiropractic Medicine. Volume 7, Issue 3.


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Exercise, It Really Is A Wonder Drug

First-time marathon runners can reap significant cardiovascular benefits, according to British researchers.† In the British "Marathon Study," subjects consisted of 138 untrained healthy individuals aged 21 to 69 years.† Each underwent 6 months of training for the upcoming London Marathons in 2016 and 2017.† Subjects were assessed prior to initiating their marathon training and again 2-weeks post marathon.† The researchers found that training for and completing the marathons, even at relatively low exercise intensity, reduced central blood pressure and aortic stiffness - equivalent to a 4-year reduction in vascular age.† Moreover, greater rejuvenation was observed in older, slower individuals.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Jan 7, 20 | Vol. 75 No. 1


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Most Parents Have Issues With Their Teenís Gaming Habits

According to a new study, almost 9 out of 10 parents agree that their teens are spending too much time playing video games.† Moreover, more than half of parents set gaming time limits for their teens.† Parents expressed some of their most serious concerns as being the negative impact on their teenís overall sleep, family and peer relationships and overall school performance.† So what are parents to do?† First, experts suggest that parents do not attempt to suggest that gaming is a sort of mindless waste of time.† Teens can feel strongly that many games are complex, challenging and include valuable lessons.† Trying to convince them that all games are bad and a waste of time can backfire. Instead, parents should consider the "everything in moderation" approach.† Set reasonable guidelines and explain gaming limitations and restrictions are being done for the purpose of safety, health, relationship and school interests.† These are very specific reasons and more easily accepted than the "all games are bad" approach.† Another strategy is for parents to consider participating in some video game playing with their teens.† According to the researchers, "Showing your teen you are interested in what they are playing and want to understand their interest can help in communicating healthy limits. In some situations, games can serve as a point of connection and occasionally may be structured as a family activity to open the door to other conversations and foster interaction."

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: University of Michigan's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll, online Jan


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